God Never Leaves Us Stranded

“This is a time of knowing who you are and who I Am while at the same time, holding, or carrying, the mystery within you. That mystery is the tension of opposites. It is time and eternity. Love and hate. Good and evil. In other words, All and Nothing. It is the tension of individuation, a tension that has existed since the beginning of time, between time and eternity, between the attributeless love and the attribute laden being. Between the one being of love and the many beings of form, between love’s extension and form’s projection.” (ACOL, D:Day39.38)

This is a lovely passage that seeks to merge opposites, reality’s true expression in our world. We may reach for the positive, but until our vision is perfect, we also see the negative. If our vision is perfect, the negative doesn’t appear negative to us; our sight of deplorable conditions sees beyond them to a radiant future for all. We know that all will work out eventually, and sooner rather than later, if we do our part.

We need to know “who we are” if we are to see conditions transforming before our eyes. We need to be real, be truthful, and be aware of the differences between honesty and complicity in untruths. This requires true knowledge of ourselves, the kind that Jesus is extending to us with every word, especially toward the end of A Course of Love. He is drawing together all the threads of what he has begun with us, culminating in language that is beauty.

We are individuated or differentiated beings, part of God but not limitless as He is. We are finite creatures, but we can come to know more when we have aligned ourselves with His goodness.

We have form in this world, but it is not form that captures us. We are leaving illusion behind as we walk the pathway that God has set out for us. We are truly walking into a new and different world, one in which atrocities will cease to be real to us. We will not be heartless in this world, but we will see differently, and we will see God’s love extending even in the worst, deplorable human situation.

God never leaves us stranded.

Dear God,

I know that you would have me cease to look on the bad things of this world with a head that is shaking in disbelief. Our free will makes for bad situations sometimes. But we can see differently, but not heartlessly. I can know that You will resolve the situation when the ones involved get their thinking and their feeling in the right place, the place that You are constantly pointing out to anyone who will listen.

Thank You for letting me know that You are not heartless, even though our world seems on the edge so often. Turning to You resolves difficulties, even the worst ones. You give a solace that can’t be touched by deplorable conditions in our sad world.

Amen.

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5 thoughts on “God Never Leaves Us Stranded

  1. PeterJ

    Hello Celia. Thank you for your constant reminders of what is important.

    I find it odd that you endorse these teachings yet pray to God as if he is an object apart.
    Perhaps this is a mistake on my part but it seems to me that the Jesus of ACIM does not endorse this idea. I have no intention of starting an argument but just wondered whether I’m misreading you or we disagree.

    Would it not be better to say that when our vision is imperfect we see the positive and the negative but when perfected see neither and thus transcend the world of opposites?

    1. God is within, but I see Him as a personal God, abiding within, who can call to my mind and heart anything that I need that will aid me. God lives through me, but I am not in contact with everyone and everything, as He/She is.

      That is all. ACOL calls God the “Self” Who is yet beyond us and in us, and Whom our inner Christ-Self is learning about (later, discovering about).

      Theology can delay us. I find a personal God very comforting, and to effect that, I realize that I seem to objectify Him/Her.

      Thank you for raising this question.

      Love, Celia

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