Tag Archives: faith

Feet on the Ground / Fingertips in Heaven

“All actions which stem from reversed thinking are literally the behavioral expressions of those who know not what they do. Actually, Jeane Dixon was right in her emphasis on ‘feet on the ground and fingertips in Heaven.’ Although she was too literal for some, many people knew exactly what she meant, so her statement was the right miracle for them.” (ACIM, COA ed., T-1.43.9:1-3)

I am delighted with Jeane Dixon’s characterization of a good way to be. Only recently in reading the new edition of A Course in Miracles, by the Circle of Atonement, did I read what Jeane said many years ago. But I had, years ago also, said something similar to characterize my way of being in this world, and it was “feet on the ground and my head in the clouds.”

We often do live a kind of double life in this world when we are seeking for higher answers. When our minds and hearts seek to know eternal truths, it certainly can feel as though we have our “fingertips in Heaven.” But, to live here, we have to be stabilized with a rational mind and heart, living practically, and this is evidenced by the saying, “feet on the ground.”
When we know not of what we are doing, we are living askew. This is an echo from one of Jesus’ statements of forgiveness from the cross. (“Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.”) We find in A Course in Miracles, particularly the complete edition, that Jesus often revisits his life on earth, quoting from words written in the New Testament.

When we have walked along the pathway of Atonement, the pathway of surrender to God, of return to Him, healing the separation, we often have to balance our thoughts of eternity with “real life” practicality. Jesus wants us still to understand our brothers and sisters who are not yet on this pathway, and to understand them, we have to remember from where we have come.

Walk today as Jeane Dixon encourages, “feet on the ground but fingertips in Heaven.”

We can do no better than that while we still occupy space in this world.

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Suffering

“One of the more horrible examples of inverted or upside-down thinking (and history is full of horrible examples of this) was the Nazis’ ‘Final Solution.’ I shed many tears over this, but it is by no means the only time I said, ‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.” (ACIM, COA ed., T-1.43.8:1-2)

In this passage from the complete edition of A Course in Miracles, Jesus tells us personally what type of reaction he has had and continues to have over the terrible deeds of humankind and the suffering these deeds have wrought for ordinary people. He specifically refers to unspeakable crimes against Jewish people during World War II. Jesus responds with an appeal to the Father, “Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.”

His reaction is to be our own when we consider awful occurrences of human against human in this world. Jesus says that he has repeated his prayer with many incidents. We must do the same.

In this world, we cannot ever understand the “why” of suffering that innocent human beings undergo. Pat Rodegast’s Emmanuel says this. Perhaps an incomplete answer would be that it is enough for us to recognize in our own suffering that, when it is passed, we comprehend more; we may never understand, but we can realize that through it all, God was with us, and we have grown. I do not mean to say that the end justifies the means. We simply can’t with our little minds wrap around the awful things that people go through. It is a mystery.

But God does not “cause” our suffering. And it is never right, Jesus tells us in A Course of Love, to blame the victim. Jesus indicates that we are to have compassion, not heartlessness. Love is the healer of suffering, the end in sight. Jesus indicates this also elsewhere in A Course of Love. In “The Way of the Heart” (from The Way of Mastery), Jesus even affirms, “There is no suffering.” Of course we can’t know fully what he means.

If we believe that God is living through us, then He is experiencing right along with us. His Presence makes all the difference when we are confronted with eternal questions that seem to have no answer. Especially when that eternal question is the “why” of suffering.

Hellfire

“Remember that I came to fulfill the law by reinterpreting it. The law itself, if properly understood, offers only protection. It is those who have not yet ‘changed their minds’ who have entered the ‘hellfire’ concept into it.” (ACIM, COA ed., T-1.42.5:6-8)

The ego is responsible for the good vs. evil world in which we live, with many of us having judgmental attitudes about those things in our world that seem to us to be wrong. We are out in left field when we judge at all; judging will keep us from Awakening. We don’t condone those things that we think are wrong, however; we simply turn aside from them, offering forgiveness and love to the people involved. As hard as it may be to believe, everybody is doing the best that he/she can at any given time, given the level of understanding that that person has.

The idea of hellfire is an egoic idea. And it comes from egoic concepts. In this, we turn aside from New Testament understandings. Jesus is giving us in A Course in Miracles a deeper concept to understand and to follow.

Jesus could not have taught about the ego prior to Freud. The ACIM scholar Ken Wapnick made this point in his lectures and books.

Our idea that there to be good, there must be evil, is also a flawed concept. Opposites are not the way of heaven. We think in contrasting ways, but our Father does not think that way. We need a new comprehension, one that will come to us as we step nearer Awakening.

Our glimpses, which have come to all of us on the pathway back to God, those who have “changed their minds,” will show us a heaven on earth that leaves no room for the illusion of evil. When we are living in the ego, we are living in illusion. True reality is something else entirely, and it is to true reality, brought to us by the Atonement, that we are heading.

We Have Been Given Everything

“Truth is always abundant. Scarcity leads to overeating and other false drives. Abundance eliminates these. Those who perceive and acknowledge that they have everything have no need for driven behavior of any kind.” (ACIM, COA ed., T-2.39.2:4-7)

Truth is one of the intangible outcomes to abundance, and abundance is the law of attraction in operation. We have been given everything, as A Course in Miracles makes clear in other passages as well as this one. We do not recognize that everything, of course, because we are finite, and knowing that we have everything requires a mind that is open to eternity, for it is in eternity that we do have everything.

The law of abundance is the idea that what we inwardly ask for, we will receive. It can be a secular idea, but the best reading of it (as with all things) is to invite the spiritual in. We are not long pleased with material objects that feed the ego; we are constantly striving for more and more, more and different, not satisfied for long.

Intangible blessings, especially the peace that passeth understanding, has none of this drive to acquire more. Peace is all or nothing (though we may not perceive it this way). And peace is our due when we invite this great calm. And all we need do is ask.

Note: I have a new blog on the spiritual dimensions of the law of attraction, entitled “Thou Shalt Receive,” a blog that is being well-received. I welcome your visits: http://halesceliaelaine.wordpress.com

Thank you.

Miracles

“A miracle is a correction factor introduced into false thinking by me. It acts as a catalyst, shaking up erroneous perception and snapping it into place.” (ACIM, COA ed., T-1.37.1)

Jesus indicates that he is personally involved in the bringing of miracles. And, as we learn elsewhere, miracles are always expressions of love. This means that they are expressions of love that Jesus inspires. We ought to be very humble in the midst of such knowledge.

Our own self-directed “miracles” would likely be misguided, because we cannot see the whole picture. Often we think that we would like to do something nice for someone, and we wonder if this is a legitimate miracle to perform. Just ask in our mind. That is the best way to come to understanding. Wait for the intuitive nod from Jesus himself.

It is a legitimate question as to how one entity can do so much. This is simply an unknown when it comes to Jesus. We need to suspend our judgment and look at the results to the questions we pose to the universe. Once we have been reassured that all is in good order, it would be unwise to continue to doubt. Give Jesus the benefit of the doubt. I for one think he knows what he is talking about.

The perceptions of ourselves and others have been very wrong for eons. Now we have been given a way to be sure that our perceptions are clarified to real truth. Miracles effect this, and so let us ask that miracles be our way.

When we are perturbed, remember what Marianne Williamson said, “I could have had a miracle!”

Atonement and Miracles

“The answer is to never perform a miracle without asking me if you should. This spares you from exhaustion. Just because miracles are expressions of love, it does not follow that they will always be effective. I am the only one who can perform miracles indiscriminately, because I am the Atonement. You have a role in the Atonement, which I will dictate to you.” (ACIM, COA ed., T-1.35.5:1-5)

For students of A Course in Miracles, the admonition from Jesus to ASK before attempting a miracle is well-known. But how many of us really do stop ourselves as we go about our day, asking if now is the right time to give an expression of love. Many of us don’t think of love at all in our daily grind; we just want to get through the day creditably. Yet expressions of love, as miracles, would mean so much to our brothers and sisters. And to us, for the first person that a miracle affects is the one who is charged with bringing that miracle into the world.

We aren’t to push ourselves to exhaustion, for this is a form of sacrifice, and Jesus has also asked that we not sacrifice ourselves, even to Love. He says that he did not do so, and thus it is correct to know that he would never ask us to do so either. We need Jesus’ guidance about when to act and when to rest. We need to know that we are proceeding under guidance that is just beyond what we normally think about in our daily pathway. The Holy Spirit and, later, the Christ-Self, will provide careful instruction to us.

We are never left in the dark about what to do next; we just need to ask of a Power greater than our little, finite, personal selves.
Jesus, in charge of the Atonement, does let us know what is expected of us by way of support for the Atonement. We are joining together to create a new day, a day of ultimate salvation, a day of Christ-consciousness or Awakening. We are needed. All of us.

Mission

“Souls cannot rest until everyone has found salvation.” (ACIM, COA ed., T-1.27:3)

Here Jesus says something that I read a long time ago in Edgar Cayce. (Jesus mentions Cayce in the complete edition of A Course in Miracles.) Edgar indicated that certain souls came to earth to rescue other souls who had lost the light and were trapped here. In this quotation, Jesus seems to be saying that we have a mission, to save souls. Of course, we aren’t encouraged to save souls if the people having those souls are not open to hearing from us. We wait until God’s Voice has spoken to their hearts.

I think that this statement of Jesus goes a long way toward explaining the heralding of the elevated Self of form in A Course of Love. We need to inhabit a physical body to fulfill our mission. A Course in Miracles had focused on the ethereal so much that many of us just wanted to be rid of the earth, to get on with a better place on the Other Side. But we are needed here.

Each day we might ask the Holy Spirit or our deeper Self what the miracles for the day really are. As we know, we don’t make this decision. We ask how we might best express love in our daily round. We ask, and we are told. Then we act.