Tag Archives: obsessions

Remaining in the Flow

“We give ourselves the luxury and the freedom to feel and think whatever we feel or think.  We allow whatever comes; and release whatever goes.”  COL bk.2, 19:II

Here we are hearing another way of saying that we remain “in the flow.”  We don’t hang on to our thoughts and feelings; we let them drift in and out of our mind and heart.  This is the best way to live, because it gives us immediacy, the ability to live in the present.

Letting thoughts and feelings go and come is a luxury.  If we can discover how to do it, we will live far better, constantly.

All too often we dam up our thoughts and feelings; we obsess; and we make ourselves miserable.  This misery does not have to be.  Instead, we can be aware of God’s presence, living through us.  We can know that He is able to handle anything that comes up, anything that arises in our daily round. 

With this assurance, we walk a green earth.

Relief from Obsessional Thinking

“Now, despite the rapidity of movement or lack thereof, to read the Trea¬tises together will likely feel as if it is almost a waste of valuable time. Thus, gatherings of those working with the Treatises will naturally include more sharing of experiences. The facilitator’s task is now one of placing these expe¬riences in context. After giving the group time to talk, the facilitator might choose a brief passage that will fit within the content of the sharing. Always it is the facilitator’s role to guide the individual group members away from inclinations, which may be strong during this time, to “figure things out.” Problem solving is to be discouraged. Trust is to be encouraged. Often a discussion can be facilitated greatly by the question, “How might we be able to look at this situation in a new way?” To encourage the gentleness of the art of thought over the relentless stridency of the thinking mind is always helpful. Obsessive thinking is always ruthless, judgmental, and wearing on the thinker. He or she needs help in breaking its grip and should never be allowed to suffer.” (ACOL, A.31)

We know about obsessive thinking, don’t we? It comes upon us at the most awful times, with our minds going around and around some matter as a record spins on its turntable. We don’t get anywhere with our obsessions. And A Course of Love is here to give us some relief.

Much of the Appendix is geared to instructions for those of us in discussion groups for ACOL. Here Jesus is particularly talking about the second part of ACOL, the Treatises. While previously, their dense prose may have attracted us, now we are encouraged not to get lost in trying to figure out everything. This “figuring out” is what leads to obsessive thinking. And our own brand of misery. Let’s be done with this, once and for all. Lead the mind flow. And let the heart give guidance to the mind, for the heart, being intuitive, doesn’t obsess.

The facilitator of group meetings has a lot on him/her. If group members are in a quandary about some part of ACOL, it is up to that facilitator to smooth things out. Other group members will help, of course, but typically their knowledge of ACOL is more limited than the knowledge of ACOL of the facilitator. Much sensitivity is called for by all members of the group, but especially the facilitator. He/she will make a real contribution to the new world we will be creating. His importance is all the more pronounced because he is listening to his heart and his guidance, not coming from a self-centered egoic stance.

Let distractions ease the obsessions that may form as we seek to “get it all” from A Course of Love. We won’t be immune to trying to study, but let’s do what we can to minimize this tendency, this temptation.

Dear God,

I have been prone to obsessions over my lifetime, but obsessional thinking is not Your way. Miracle-minded impulses are. The art of thought is based in miracles, and I ask for miracles today. Lead me to where and what I can do that is the best. Keep me mired in Your will.

Thank You for the soul-centered advice that Jesus gives us in the quotation for today. If we listen to our soul’s advice, our intuition, we will make much progress to a new and better world.

Amen.

Leave Off Fantasies and Obsessions

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“. . .[T]hese are the basic rules of the art of thought:  First, to experience what is and to acknowledge what is, both as a fact of your existence as a human being and as a gift of the Creator.  Second, to acknowledge the relationship inherent in the experience, the call for a response, and the nature of all gifts as being given to all.  (The Treatises of A Course of Love:  Treatise on the Art of Thought, 2.19)”

Affirmation:  “May I create rather than ‘make.'”

Reflections:

1 – Abstract Passage

This passage is not easy to understand because it is so abstract.  We, who so recently have been of the ego-mind, are used to concrete terms, and Jesus leaves out concrete terms when he channeled A Course of Love, especially the Treatises and the Dialogues (the latter two volumes of this trilogy).  What can we make of this difficult passage?

2 – House of Truth

We need to recognize solely “what is,” which is another way of saying that we will not be lost in illusions or in dreams any longer, but will dwell in the House of Truth.  We will not fool ourselves about what we are experiencing, lost in fantasies that bring only fleeting pleasure.  We will not be lost in fantasies at all.  Neither obsessions.  We will confront what is before us with wide-open eyes, not in the physical sense, but with the inner eye.  The Self/Christ within will be our lodestone.

3 – All Gifts Are Given to All

All gifts are given to all, not at the same time, but eventually.  We know that all gifts are shared, and that we are not “special” in any sense at all.  Or,  conversely, we are all special, but specialness is an attribute that A Course in Miracles downplays.  We are not actually special in that we possess anything that others do not also possess on some level.  Right now gifts seem to vary among people, but this will not always be the case.  In eternity all is shared; all gifts are shared.

4 – A Call for Response

What we experience calls for a response from us.  And this response practices the art of thought.  We do not feel a responsibility for others, to do for them what they can do for themselves, but we do respond when they are in need.  The need is, after all, only temporary, for all needs are met immediately.  It is only wants that are not always answered, and perhaps that would not be a good thing.  The solution is always with the problem.  We need not fear.  God is within, answering our every need.  And from this point of certainty, we respond to Him and to others.  We give of ourselves in this transaction, and we are not fearful in the giving.  We know that giving and receiving are one.

Prayer:

Dear Father/Mother,

I would try to experience, directly, what is–not what I might wish for in fantasies or obsessions.  What is, is the art of thought in one of its main components.  Thank You for the clarity that today’s passage gives to this new concept.  May I take it unto my heart and walk a clear pathway back to You, a clear path with clear vision to see my way.

I have gifts, and this is not ego.  So does everyone else.  And these gifts right now vary, but ultimately all gifts will be shared with each other.  And there is no ego in this.  I need to be all that I can be for my brothers and sister, and I ask Your help to keep my Christ/Self perking away, with the go ever-withering, disappearing entirely.

Thank You for the benefits that Jesus has pointed out to us in A Course of Love.  May I comprehend with my wholeheartedness, and may my mind no longer try to dominate my heart.

Amen.