Tag Archives: reason

Reason & Faith

There is a difference between what is metaphorically true and what is actually true. When the way seems rough, it is likely that one is being propelled by a metaphor. Instruction for living is found therein, but not those things that will be actualized in the time and place of this plane. And faith that it will be is misplaced faith, particularly likely to lead one even deeper into illusion.

I was greatly relieved in my college classes in religion to learn that one of the Church Fathers had declared that one need not believe on faith anything that contradicted reason. As my beliefs about Reality have changed, so has my reasoning about it. But the Holy Spirit leads gently and leads us willingly; just so long as He is dealing with a skeptic, so ever gentle will He lead. Now I read in the Course that the Holy Spirit uses reason to undo insanity. (T-21.V.9:1) Reason actually lies in the union of my will with that of the Father.

With these words the gentle pathway back becomes illumined as by a lightning bolt. Perhaps the Holy Spirit needs reason even more than blind faith. If truly blind, one is not using her sane mind, but is particularly apt, perhaps, to follow a will o’ wisp of falsity to its mad conclusion.

Choose the Heart over Reason & Intellect

“You who have made a god of reason and of intellect, think carefully now of what your reason and your intellect have made for you. How terrible would it really be to realize that although you have tried mightily, a creation such as this cannot be made to make any sense at all? Those who have turned their backs on God and refused to believe in such nonsense have simply refused to make reason try to fit the unfitable without seeing that an alternative exists.” (ACOL, C:14.7)

Those of us who have carefully studied in school may still believe that reason is something of a god. We were also told in our religious studies that nothing in faith has to contradict reason, making of reason a god again.

Jesus feels differently about reason. He thinks that it can go only so far, and that the matters of reason and intellect have gotten out of kilter with matters of the heart. He has us turn, repeatedly, to the heart to find our answers. He suggests in this passage that we have tried and tried to make reason and the intellect solve our problems, but we have failed, because our intent was wrong. The heart, on the other hand, can lead us rightly.

The heart is the alternative. Nobody needs to think long and hard when Jesus says to “turn to the heart.” We know immediately what he is saying, and it resonates with us. Later on, he clarifies by saying that mind must be taught by the heart, and we must move into a fusion of heart and mind that he calls wholeheartedness. But the mind, made up of the reason and the intellect, has failed us mightily in the past, and if we are not careful, it will continue to fail us mightily in the future.

The mind developed the ego. We are trying to leave the ego behind as the prime mover in the realm of separation from God. Even though separation from God is actually impossible, in illusion we can make many things seem possible to us. Let the heart lead the mind into new and different realms. We will never regret this new direction, whereas we have much to regret from the ascendancy of the mind alone.

Our reason and intellect have been, all too often, misguided. Let the heart right their wrongs.

We will never be sorry that we have tried this new way.